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我们不是英雄

我们不是英雄



我们翻译这篇文章的理由


杂货店员工,超市员工等被称为抗疫英雄,社会感谢他们并给予他们荣誉称号。但在他们看来这个称号是否是荣誉?他们对自己又有何定位呢?

——田阳光


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我们不是英雄


作者:Karleigh Frisbie Brogan & Da Grundy

译者:田阳光 & 何翔宇

校对:张松

策划:田阳光 & 王宇琪


Calling Me a Hero Only Makes You Feel Better

称我为英雄,只能让你感觉好一点


Working in a grocery store has earned me and my co-workers a temporary status. After years of being overlooked, we suddenly feel a sense of responsibility, solidarity, and pride. On a private Facebook group page for my company, Trader Joe’s, one employee from Washington State posted a picture of a company-issued work shirt hanging from the ceiling of the store. A sign attached to the shirt read not all heroes wear scrubs.

在杂货店工作的我们常年被忽视,近来却突然获得了个新身份,这让我们突然感到了一种责任感、团结感和荣誉感。在我们公司乔氏杂货店在脸书的内部群组里,一个华盛顿州的雇员发布了一张挂在店里天花板的公司工作衫的照片,衣服旁的标语写着“不是所有的英雄都穿医护服”。

乔氏杂货店是一家总部在美国加利福尼亚州的美国本土连锁杂货店,遍布全美,主营高质量、高性价比的食品等百货。


I’m grateful to be acknowledged for the risky work we’re doing. Being in an environment where morale is up despite global uncertainty is encouraging. But I have a problem with all this hero talk. It’s a pernicious label perpetuated by those who wish to gain something—money, goods, a clean conscience—from my jeopardization.

我很感激大家对我们所做的冒险工作的认可。尽管疫情形势下全球充满了不确定性,而员工士气仍然高涨,这一点令人备受鼓舞。但我对这些英雄的说法有意见。不断给我们贴上英雄标签的人,是想通过把我们置身于危险中来获得金钱、财物和清白的良心。这是一个对我们而言有害的标签。

 

Sometime in the second half of March, panic shopping was well under way, all nonessential businesses had already closed, and the nation was quickly adapting to shelter-in-place mandates. Though the sales floor at my store in Portland, Oregon, was swarming with customers, my boss announced an impromptu, drop-everything meeting in the back room. I assumed we would be given the order to shut down or shift to curbside pickup only.

三月下旬的某天,全国人民都在进行恐慌性的抢购,所有非必要企业都已关闭,全国各地正在迅速落实“就地避难”的规定。在我所在的俄勒冈州波特兰市,尽管彼时我们的购物层挤满了顾客,我的老板却宣布要我们停下手中所有的工作,在里屋召开一次紧急会议。我还以为他要宣布停业或者转换成路边取货的销售形式。

 

Once we were all gathered in the back, seated on overturned milk crates, my boss removed a folded-up piece of paper from his pocket and began to read a letter from our company’s management that thanked us, presumptively, for our “confidence and steadiness” and offered our store a bonus. He quoted a customer who called our efforts “a lifeline.”

当我们所有人都在后面聚齐,坐在翻过来的牛奶箱上时,我老板从口袋里拿出一张折好的纸,开始宣读来自公司管理层的信,大概是感谢我们的“信心和稳定”,并给我们店发了奖金。他引用了一位顾客的话,称我们的努力是“生命线”。


Before the close of the meeting, my boss led us in a round of applause for our own hard work and dauntlessness. Though I clapped, something didn’t sit right with me. Unlike medical personnel and emergency responders, we didn’t sign up for potentially life-threatening work. We can’t check the temperature of people entering our store or maintain a safe distance from one another. At the time that memo was read, we were discouraged from wearing masks, because their efficacy against the coronavirus was undetermined. I felt this advice had little to do with pointlessness and more to do with optics. Consumers wouldn’t feel comfortable coming into our store if it looked like the inside of an operating theater.

散会前,老板带领大家鼓掌,为自己辛勤工作和无畏精神而鼓掌。虽然我鼓起了掌,但我心里还是有些不舒服。跟医护人员和急救员不同,我们没有报名参加可能会有生命危险的工作。我们不能检查进入我们店里的人的体温,也不能相互之间保持安全距离。在老板读那封信的时候,还阻拦我们戴口罩,因为“口罩对新冠病毒的预防效果尚不明确”。我觉得这个建议与戴口罩是否有效没有什么关系,更多的是与视觉效果有关。消费者进了我们的店,如果里面看着像是个手术室,会觉得不舒服。 

 

Since that backroom huddle, I have read daily about the newest essential frontline workers—bus drivers, people who work with the homeless community, and, mainly, grocery-store employees. The nation’s leaders and cultural influencers have been tweeting their praises. Every major news outlet has featured a story that has established us as heroes. “We ought to thank [supermarket employees] for their service, not blame them because market lines are long or inventory is low,” a Los Angeles Times article said.

自从那场里屋会议之后,我每天都会读到关于最新的一线工人的报道,例如公交车司机、无家可归者社区的工作人员,最主要的还是杂货店的员工。国家领导人和网红们在推特上发表着他们的赞美。每家主流新闻媒体都刊登了一个故事,把我们塑造成英雄。《洛杉矶时报》的一篇文章说,“我们应该感谢(超市员工们)的服务,而不是因为排队时间长或库存少而责备他们。”


I fear that many of my co-workers are so high on recognition and glorification, they can’t see the real danger they’re in. It troubles me to hear about people like Jason Hargrove, the Detroit bus driver who died less than two weeks after a passenger coughed openly on his bus, or about how New York City’s hardest-hit neighborhoods are low-income and full of the working poor. I’m afraid that when a grocery-store worker does fall ill, the measures taken in response might lack transparency.

我担心我的许多同事被认可和美誉所鼓舞,以至于忽视眼前的危险。底特律的公交车司机杰森·哈格罗夫因为一名乘客在车上咳嗽时未遮挡而不到两周就离世,纽约市受灾最严重社区住的是从事低报酬的穷忙族,我听到这些新闻就会觉得很心痛。担心当杂货店工人生病倒下时,外人很难知晓他们得到了什么样的治疗。

 

Cashiers and shelf-stockers and delivery-truck drivers aren’t heroes. They’re victims. To call them heroes is to justify their exploitation. By praising the blue-collar worker’s public service, the progressive consumer is assuaged of her cognitive dissonance. When the world isn’t falling apart, we know the view of us is usually as faceless, throwaway citizens. The wealthy CEO telling his thousands of employees that they are vital, brave, and noble is a manipulative strategy to keep them churning out profits.

收银员,理货员和送货卡车司机都不是英雄,他们是受害者。称他们为英雄是为剥削他们辩护。通过赞扬蓝领工人们的公共服务,具有进步思想的消费者可以缓解内心的不安。当世界还在正常的时候,我们知道,社会对我们的印象常常是无需关注,可以被牺牲的公民。富有的首席执行官告诉他成千上万的员工他们至关重要,勇敢而又高尚,这便可以操纵他们不断赚取利润。

 

I have immense gratitude for my job. I love my co-workers like family. I respect the company that has employed me and given me excellent health-insurance benefits for more than 16 years. The anger I have is not toward my boss, or my boss’s boss, or even that guy’s boss. It’s toward an unfair system that will never change if we workers don’t question the motivations behind such mythmaking.

我对我的工作心怀感激。我像爱家人一样爱我的同事。我尊重过去16年来雇用我并为我提供卓越健康保险福利的公司。我的愤怒不是针对我的上司,或是上司的老板,甚至不是更高层级的老板。我是在抨击一种不公平的制度,如果我们的员工不怀疑把他们编成神话背后的动机,这种制度将永远不会改变。

 

I have taken a temporary unpaid leave of absence because I can afford to. I know that many of our country’s essential workers aren’t so lucky. They don’t have a savings account or a second income or a family member to fall back on. They can’t shelter in place while working from home or collecting unemployment. If they stop showing up, they have no income to survive on, and may even lose health benefits or jobs altogether. Maybe they don’t work for a company with fair sick-leave practices or insurance qualifications. Maybe they aren’t guaranteed a job to return to when they’re feeling more physically and emotionally robust, when their city’s projected peak-infection date has passed.

我已经暂时无薪休假,因为负担得起代价。我知道我们国家的许多关键岗位的工人并不那么幸运。他们没有储蓄帐户或额外收入,也没有家庭成员依靠。他们无法面对居家工作和失业。如果他们不去上班,他们会失去维持生活的收入,甚至可能失去健康福利和工作。也许因为是他们没有在有合理病假措施或取得保险资格的公司工作。也许是因为当预计的感染高峰日期已经过后,他们在身体和情绪上准备好重返工作岗位时,他们不能保证找到工作。

 

I can’t speak for every occupation, but for supermarket cashiers, I think the best way you can show your respect is by not showing up at all. Minimize your shopping outings, and make them quick and efficient. Please save the small talk for next year. And I beg of you, don’t call my co-workers heroes as you wait for them to bag your carrot-cake muffins and face serum. They would trade places with you if they could.

我不能代表所有职业,但是对于超市收银员来说,我认为表达敬意的最好方法便是不要去超市。尽可能减少购物次数,并且迅速购置物品。闲聊还是留到以后吧。我还请求不要因为我的同事帮你们打包胡萝卜蛋糕松饼和面霜而称呼他们为英雄,如果可能的话,他们倒是愿意和你们交换位置,让你们体验下当英雄的滋味。



我们不是英雄

  • 本文原载于 The Atlantic

  • 原文链接:https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/04/i-work-grocery-store-dont-call-me-hero/610147/


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